A Greedy, Gluttonous Galaxy

It’s no secret that the universe is growing. However, research leads us to believe that our own Milky Way Galaxy is growing as well. In fact, our galaxy exhibits cannibalistic behavior, absorbing material from the dwarf galaxies surrounding it. We know that the chemical makeup in the central bulge of our galaxy differs from the chemical makeup of the outer halo of our galaxy, and we have also found that the chemical makeup of the outer halo of our galaxy is similar to the chemical makeup of stars found in dwarf galaxies orbiting our galaxy – namely, the Large Magellanic Cloud and the Sagittarius Dwarf Elliptical Galaxy. Therefore, these dwarf galaxies may simply be the leftovers of galaxies that were long ago absorbed into our own galaxy.

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Milky Way Galaxy

Astronomers believe the key to understanding the growth of our galaxy is learning more about the dark matter around our galaxy. The halo of dark matter surrounding our galaxy actually exerts a gravitational force on smaller, neighboring galaxies, so it may be that dark matter is ripping away stars and pulling them into the external regions of our galaxy. There are still so many unanswered questions about dark matter and dark energy, but a project called the Dark Energy Survey is currently underway, in which we are using a tool called the Dark Energy Camera to detect stellar streams. Stellar streams are groups of relatively few stars that have been ripped away. They are difficult to detect because we are looking for a small number of stars in such a large region of space. Nevertheless, these stellar streams illustrate how our galaxy is constructed from smaller galaxies, so the future findings of the Dark Energy Survey should prove exciting!

 

Links:

http://www.astronomy.com/news/2018/02/did-the-milky-way-devour-other-galaxies-to-grow

http://www.futurity.org/milky-way-stellar-streams-1653962/

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